Day Thirty Seven – The Hymn Book of the Bible

First, let me clear some things up. When we speak of the “Book of Psalms” it is used in the plural. If we speak of one Psalm it is “Psalm”. Such as Psalm 1, Psalm 50, you get the idea. Psalms has no chapters, they are referred to as Psalms. There are 150 Psalms in this great Bible Hymnbook.

The Psalms are written by a few different men. David is the most noted one; then there is Moses who could have written Psalms 90 – 100; he is noted as having written Psalm 90. There is a possibility that Daniel wrote Psalm 137, or at least someone who had been taken captive to Babylon. There is also a fellow by the name of Asaph who wrote some of the Psalms.

The longest Psalm is 119 having 176 verse; and the shortest Psalm is 117 having only 2 verses.

Of course it makes no difference who the human author is; they are here by the inspiration of God; and they are both a corrective instrument of God as well as words of encouragement to all who read them. It would be great to have heard them sung from the mouths and hearts of those who wrote them.

Our reading for today is Psalms 1 – 14.

I will share with you today from the Treasury of David, by Charles H. Spurgeon on Psalm 8:3-4,

“When I consider Thy heavens, the work of Thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which Thou hast ordained; what is man, that Thou art mindful of him? And the son of man, that Thou visitest him?” Psalm 8:3-4 (KJB)

“At the close of that excellent little manual entitled “The Solar System,” written by Dr. Dick, we find an eloquent passage which beautifully expounds the text: – A survey of the solar system has a tendency to moderate the pride of man and to promote humility. Pride is one of the distinguishing characteristics of puny man, and has been one of the chief causes of all the contentions, wars, devastations, systems of slavery, and ambitious projects which have desolated and demoralized our sinful world. Yet there is no disposition more incongruous to the character and circumstance of man. Perhaps there are no rational beings throughout the universe among whom pride would appear more unseemly or incompatible than in man, considering the situation in which he is placed, He is exposed to numerous degradations and calamities, to the rage of storms and tempests, the devastations of earthquakes and volcanoes, the fury of whirlwinds, and the tempestuous billows of the ocean, to the ravages of the sword, famine, pestilence, and numerous diseases; and at length he must sink into the grave, and his body must become the companion of worms! The most dignified and haughty of the sons of men are liable to these and similar degradations as well as the meanest of the human family. Yet, in such circumstances, man – that puny worm of the dust, whose knowledge is so limited, and whose follies are so numerous and glaring – has the effrontery to strut in all the haughtiness of pride, and to glory in his shame.
When other arguments and motives produce little effect on certain minds, no considerations seem likely to have a more powerful tendency to counteract this deplorable propensity in human beings, than those which are borrowed from the objects connected with astronomy. They show us what an insignificant being – what a mere atom, indeed, man appears amidst the immensity of creation! Though he is an object of the paternal care and mercy of the Most High, yet he is but as a grain of sand to the whole earth, when compared to the countless myriads of beings that people the amplitudes of creation. What is the whole of this globe on which we dwell compared with the solar system, which contains a mass of matter ten thousand times greater? What is it in comparison of the hundred millions of suns and worlds which by the telescope have been described throughout the starry regions? What, then, is a kingdom, a province, or a baronial territory, of which we are as proud as if we were the lords of the universe and for which we engage in so much devastation and carnage? What are they, when set in competition with the glories of the sky? Could we take our station on the lofty pinnacles of heaven, and look down on this scarcely distinguishable speck of earth, we should be ready to exclaim with Seneca, “Is it to this little spot that the great designs and vast desires of men are confined? Is it for this there is so much disturbance of nations, so much carnage, and so many ruinous wars? Oh, the folly of deceived men, to imagine great kingdoms in the compass of an atom, to raise armies to decide a point of earth with the sword!” Dr. Chalmers, in his Astronomical Discourses, very truthfully says, “We gave you but a feeble image of our comparative insignificance, when we said that the glories of an extended forest would suffer no more from the fall of a single leaf, than the glories of this extended universe would suffer though the globe we tread upon, ‘and all that it inherits, should dissolve.’”” TREASURY OF DAVID

We are the chief of the Creation of God. Sin is the cause of our demise, our death; and the devastation we see in the creation. David, “the sweet Psalmist of Israel” (2 Samuel 23:1) recognized our sin, and much of the Psalms deals with this; and his desire for God.

No man desires God from his/her own mind or heart; it is given by God. God has however given us only one way, one path to Himself, and that is through the sacrificial death of His Son Jesus on the cross, His burial, and His resurrection. Call on His name in full repentance of your sin, believe Him, and be saved; be born again.

 


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