Observation of the Righteous
Job 4:1 – 7:21

Eliphaz was a man of observation. He makes his judgments upon Job by what he has observed in the “spiritual experience” of others. Note the “…Even as I have seen…” of verse 8.
The God Eliphaz worshiped was an inflexible lawgiver. His theology left little to no room for grace.
Eliphaz answered the words from Job’s mouth, rather than the pain of his heart.
Keep in mind that these three friends of Job have no where received God’s commendation of righteousness – Job has.

I. JOB’S FRIENDS ACKNOWLEDGE JOB’S PAST GOODNESS (4:1-4).
A. Friends notice the way we live our lives.
B. They know if we are generous or not – it seems to be that Job was generous.
C. This was a soft way of building up to criticism.

II. ACCUSED OF BEING ABLE TO GIVE COUNSEL; BUT UNWILLING TO RECEIVE IT (vv. 5-11).
A. This is actually an accusation of Job accusing others, but being unable to receive it himself.
B. Some of what Job’s accusers say is true;
1. People do reap what they sow (Gal. 6:7-8).
2. Job had not, however, sowed iniquity or sin.
C. There are many a martyr who have perished in innocence and guilty of no wrong, and falsely accused.

III. EXPERIENCE AND OBSERVATION ARE NOT ALWAYS DEPENDABLE MEANS OF MAKING JUDGMENTS (4:12 – 5:7).
A. Eliphaz’s judgments were based on two arguments;
1. Experience (4:12-21)
a. Truth in judgment coannot be based on one’s own experiences alone.
b. There was not “Thus says the LORD…” here.
2. Observation (5:1-7);
a. Sinners prosper and judged losing everything;
b. Eliphaz was subtlely attribuiting Job’s situation to sin which he had lived and committed against God… which was false accusation.
B. Our observations are limited not knowing fully the plan of God for the lives of others.
1. Just a casual observation of life would seem to imply that God judges sinners and everything bad that happens is due to someone’s sin.
2. Man is born to trouble (5:7).

IV. CONFESSION OF UNCOMMITTED SIN (5:8-27).
A. Eliphaz was trying to convince Job to make a deal with God – Job refused.
B. In doing so we disgrace God, and vindicate the devil.

V. AN APPEAL TO GOD AND FRIENDS (6 – 7).
A. Job’s appeal to his friends – a child defined “Sympathy” as “Your pain in my heart”, and knew more about giving comfort than Job’s friends.
1. They did not feel the heaviness of his suffering;
2. They did not understand the bitterness of his suffering;
3. They could not feel the hopelessness of his situation (6:12-13).
a. Hopelessness leads to feeling useless to others, and to God;
b. When you feel useless you do not want to live.
B. Job pointed out the ineffectiveness of their ministry to him (vv. 14-30).
C. Job made two requests of his friends;
1. Teach me (v. 24);
2. Look upon me (v. 28).
D. Job’s appeal to God (chapter 7).
1. He describes the futility of life to God;
a. In the army against his will;
b. A laborer waiting for sunset, or in our day till the end of the week; to receive his wages.
2. He focused on life’s brevity (v. 6).
3. He felt God’s constant watch upon him (v. 12).
a. There is no way Job could escape the constant watch and care of God;
b. The same is true of you and I today.
4. Job’s confession of sin is not confession that some sin he has committed has brought God’s judgment (vv. 20-21).
a. The NIV – “If I have sinned…”
b. The NKJV – “Have I sinned…”
5. Job has yet maintained his integrity – not falsely confessing sin he has not committed.
6. He has opened his heart up for God to more fully reveal Himself and Job’s weaknesses.
E. When you commit sin – confess it – but do not confess sins you have not committed.
1. It weakens your stand with God.
2. It also weakens your power in prayer.

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