We read the Song of Solomon, sometimes called the Song of Songs this morning, chapters 1 – 8.  The title reflects on what the lesson on today.

I want you to note the difference between chapter 8 verse 4, and chapter 2 verse 7, and chapter 3 verse 5.  These three verses are the refrain of the song, repeated.  There is a difference in the last one however.

“I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, until he please.” Song of Solomon 8:4 (KJB)

“I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please.” 2:7

“I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please.” 3:5

I close with the commentary of the Pulpit Commentary of chapter 8 verse 4:

“I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, that ye stir not up, nor awaken love, until it please. This, of course, as the refrain of the song, must be taken as a general sentiment. Love is its own lord. Let it have free course. Let it perfect itself in its own best way. The form of the adjuration is abbreviated in this case. The omission of the words, “By the roes and by the hinds of the field,” is not without its significance. Is it not intended to intimate that the natural love, to which reference was made by the introduction of the beautiful wild creatures of the field, is now no more in the thoughts of the bride, because it has been sublimated into the higher sisterly love of which she has been speaking? She is not merely the lovely woman on whom the king dotes because of her personal beauty; she is his companion and dearest friend. He opens his heart to her. He teaches her. He lifts her up to his own level. She participates in his royal dignity and majesty. The ἔρως of her first estate of love is now exalted into the ἀγάπη, which is the grace never to be without its sphere, abiding forever. We must not press too closely the poetic form of the song. Something must be allowed for the framework in which the main ideas are set before us. It may not be possible to answer the question—Who are intended to be symbolized by the daughters of Jerusalem? There is no necessity to seek further into the meaning of the whole poem than its widest and most general application. But the daughters of Jerusalem are in a lower position, a less favoured relation to the bridegroom, than the bride herself. We may, therefore, without hesitation, accept the view that by the adjuration is intended the appeal of the higher spiritual life against all that is below it; the ideal love calling upon all that is around it and all that is related to it to rise with it to perfection. The individual soul is thus represented claiming the full realization of its spiritual possibilities. The Church of God thus remonstrates against all that hinders her advancement, restrains her life, and interrupts her blessedness. Jerusalem has many daughters. They are not all in perfect sympathy with the bride. When they listen to the adjurations of the most spiritual, the most devoted, the most heavenly and Christ-like of those who are named by the Name of the Lord, they will themselves be lifted up into the bridal joy of “the marriage supper of the Lamb.”” From the PULPIT COMMENTARY e-Sword edition

Married couples ought read and study this book together, noting how these two people, the groom and the bride adore and love one another.

Our love for Jesus Christ would be even greater when we listen to what He says, and believe that His love for us is a glorious, eternal love; and we will love Him too.

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